Institute Staff

Sarah Arbuthnot Lendt

Sarah Arbuthnot Lendt

Institute Coordinator / dontdeny@ku.edu

Sarah Arbuthnot Lendt earned her M.A. in English from the University of Kansas in 2007. She currently serves as the Grants Coordinator for the Project on the History of Black Writing (HBW) and as an online English instructor for Grantham University. Sarah has also worked as program assistant to the University of Denver's Strategic Issues Program, grantwriter for Van Go Mobile Arts in Lawrence, KS and as the curriculum specialist for the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America in Lawrence, KS. In her 10 years with HBW, she has worked as the editorial assistant on the Cambridge Companion to the African American Novel and the Cambridge History of African American Literature and coordinated the NEH-funded program Language Matters II: Reading and Teaching Toni Morrison (2005). Sarah was grant and institute coordinator for an additional two NEH programs: Making the Wright Connection: Reading Native Son, Black Boy and Uncle Tom's Children (2010) and Don't Deny My Voice: Reading and Teaching African American Poetry (2013). In her spare time, Sarah enjoys cooking and reading. She and her husband have two children, a daughter, 2 1/2, and a son, born March 2015.

Kristin Lockridge

Kristin Coffey

Assistant Grant Coordinator

Kristin Coffey is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago, as well as the University of North Carolina at Wilmington with an MFA in Creative Writing. She is currently a third year PhD student and graduate instructor in the Department of English at the University of Kansas. Kristin's fiction and poetry have appeared in the SN Review, You Must Be This Tall to Ride and Psychic Meatloaf literary journals. She has served as assistant fiction editor for Beecher’s Magazine and is currently Assistant Grant Coordinator for The Project on the History of Black Writing. Her current work includes themes of miscegenation, displaced identity, and migration within ethnic-American literature and historical fiction.

Matthew Broussard

Matthew Broussard

Institute Staff

Matthew Broussard is a PhD student in English at the University of Kansas. He holds a bachelor's degree from Southwestern University and a master's degree from the University of Texas - Dallas. His scholarly interests include African American literature, Latin American literature, queer studies, identity and passing in black literature, appropriation, otherness, colorism, post-colonialism, and the rhetoric of black literature. Matthew will take over as the Project on the History of Black Writing's Project Digital Initiative Coordinator in the fall of 2015.

Will Cunningham

Will Cunningham

Videographer

Will Cunningham is currently a 3rd year PhD candidate in English Literature at the University of Kansas. Will completed his Masters in English at the University of Alabama and his B.A. in English at Wofford College. Will studies the intersections of race, class, and geography within the context of contemporary America fiction, specifically Literature of the American South. Will has published on Mark Twain, Toni Morrison, Cormac McCarthy, and Gayl Jones. His work has appeared in varying journals, with an article forthcoming in Mississippi Quarterly. Will has worked broadly for HBW over the last 3 years, including extensive work on the Black Book Project, a Digital Humanities project which utilizes HBW's extensive collection of rare African American novels.

David James Miller

David James Miller

Institute Staff

David James Miller is a poet, editor, and publisher. His books and chapbooks of poetry are: CANT (Black Radish Books, forthcoming 2015), As Sequence (These Signals, 2012), and Facts & Other Objects (JR Vansant, 2011). His poetry and critical writing may also be found in: The Cultural Society, LVNG, Moria, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Jacket2, Drunken Boat, and elsewhere. He is the editor of Elis Press, a publisher of innovative poetry, and SET, a biennial journal of innovative writing. He lives with his family in Lawrence where he is a PhD student, and an educator in the First-and-Second-Year English program at the University of Kansas. Prior to this, he received his MFA from Brooklyn College, of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he taught for several years in the CUNY colleges. His research interests include: poetry and poetics, ecology, marxism, and esoteric discourses.